Calligraphy Workshop in Dadar: 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th & 27th April 2012

APSC (Achyut Palav School of Calligraphy) has been organizing Calligraphy Workshops in Mumbai & Navi Mumbai.

After the successful session in Vashi last year, we bring to you a new workshop in basic calligraphy. It will be held from 23rd, 24th, 25th, 26th & 27th April, 2012. It will cover introduce you to the calligraphy pen & nibs, writing on graph paper, strokes, angle of holding, position of sitting, basic strokes, pattern making & how to thicken, thin the strokes. We will cover numbers, small & capital letters. The session ends with letter & word spacing, paragraph construction & alignment.

To book your seats please contact:

Samina Khan: 022- 2789 1517

Venue:      Achyut Palav School of Calligraphy, 28/1,Welfare Chamber, Plot No. 73, Sector No. 17, Vashi,

Navi Mumbai – 400 705
Time:        12pm to 3pm

Enroll yourself before 20th April, 2012.

Achyut Palav

———————

Achyut Palav School of Calligraphy
28/1, Welfare Chambers, Plot No. 73,
Sector-17, Vashi, Navi Mumbai.400 705
Tel: 022- 27891517


Calligraphy Workshop in Dadar: 16, 17,18,19,20 April 2012

Details: Calligraphy Workshop by Achyut Palav, 16, 17,18,19,20 April 2012

Venue: Model Art Institute

Noor Bldg., Senapati Bapat Marg,

Opp. Dadar (W.R.) Station,
Behind SUVIDHA

Mumbai 400 028

Batch I English Calligraphy Workshop (Level I)
Time: 9.00 am to 11.00 am
Fees: Rs. 2000/- (includes calligraphy pen set, papers, ink etc.)

It’s the level which is your first step into the world of calligraphy. Here we initiate you to the basics (the Science of Calligraphy). We introduce you to the calligraphy pen & nibs & how different it is from the normal pens, writing on graph paper, strokes, angle of holding, position of sitting, basic strokes & pattern making & how to thicken, thin the strokes. An alphabet & number is a combination of strokes & shapes. In any script, these strokes need thorough practice. You have to initially practice them on graph paper to help you achieve stability over your hand as well as the new equipment. An angle of 45 degrees has to be maintained to master these strokes. Practicing on graph paper makes it easier for judging the size of the stroke and maintaining uniformity between all letters. We will cover numbers, small & capital letters. The session ends with letter & word spacing & paragraph construction.

Batch II Devnagiri & English Calligraphy Workshop (Second Level)
Time: 12.00 pm 3.00 pm
Fees: Rs. 3000/- (Excludes Materials. Students have to bring their own material for workshop like papers, calligraphy tools, colors, inks etc. Preference for the students who have attended Marathi and English Level I and Art School Students)

In this level will initiate you to the alignments like the left, right & center with different spacing in between two lines. Now we move from words we move on to sentences & paragraphs. The level will cover layouts, drop letter, composition of letters, paragraphs in different styles. It also include creating greetings, scrolls graphics etc. we will have students experimenting with different styles, tools, textures, mediums & techniques.

Batch III Devnagiri or English Calligraphy Workshop (Level I)
Time: 5.30 pm 7.30 pm
Fees: Rs. 2000/- (includes calligraphy pen set, papers, ink etc.)

Contact: Sameena Khan: 022 2789 1517 (During 10 am to 6 pm)

Register your name on phone.

Enroll your name on 10th April 2012 Model Art Institute, Dadar

*Try to come 30 minutes earlier on the first day of the workshop.

 

Achyut Palav
———————

Achyut Palav School of Calligraphy
28/1, Welfare Chambers, Plot No. 73,
Sector-17, Vashi, Navi Mumbai.400 705
Tel: 022- 27891517


Modern-day scribe…it’s not all about the money (Sando artisan makes it big)

Excerpt from article by MALISSA LARA in guardian.co.tt … Read full article here

paul-antonio-attong The intimacy of a handwritten letter with a turkey quill and taking the time to create beautiful handwriting is rare.
Yet, this centuries-old tradition is kept alive by Paul Antonio Attong. In this age of high technology where a large portion of the world no longer writes but types, Trinidad-born Attong has made an international name for himself and his craft.

Do you have a large clientele?
I have a huge client list—some of my fashion clients include Asprey, De Beers, Chopard, Louis Vuitton. We do a ton of weddings and have just stared a stationery company. Our tag line for the stationery is ‘We Only Print What We Write’ so we don’t use any typefaces in our work—all of it is done by hand first then digitised then printed in one of a few high-quality print processes. Some of our corporate clients include RBS, London Business School (for invitations and certificates). Numerous party planners include the Admirable Crichton, Atom Events, Freud Communications.

Would you advise others to make a career of calligraphy?
It is very difficult to become a professional calligrapher. It requires years of dedication, and not making any money while you come to terms with your skill. It is also not easy to train as there are so few courses running. Getting a good hand is one thing but it is getting it consistent all the time that is the trick. You not only need to know what you do inside out—as you will get asked to write on all kinds of things, but you need to be able to deal with people and convince them that you are what they need! Invariably it is either you are good at art or good at business but you have to be good at both if you want to make a decent living. It is not something that happens easily. It takes time, patience, dedication, application and research.
Is it lucrative?
It is only in the past three years I have been earning a decent living. But what is lucrative? It is not only about making money—it is also about the standing amongst your peers on an international stage. It is about contributing to the corpus of knowledge in one’s field of expertise. But then there is personal wealth. Making money comes with much stress and sometimes you need to make a decision if you actually want the added stress. That is a tricky question to answer. A lot of the time making money and earning a living is to the exclusion of research—but one is financially lucrative and one is personally lucrative.


Peter’s calligraphy was a stand against the march of technology

Excerpt from a www.cotswoldjournal.co.uk

Self-employed publisher Peter Drinkwater from Shipston with examples of his delicate handwriting skills.

“Every letter Peter Drinkwater of Shipston writes is a protest against progress,” the Journal reported 20 years ago, “and everyone who has received a letter from him won’t even throw the envelope away.”

The report of 1990 continued: “As an accomplished calligrapher Mr Drinkwater uses exquisite colours and a delicate hand that stretches the elegance of 16th century handwriting across each letter and each envelope. The stamp in the right- hand corner alone identifies his letters with the 20th century “According to Mr Drinkwater, his skills hark back to a time when writing was done with a high degree of care – good handwriting was a point of etiquette.

…. read more www.cotswoldjournal.co.uk

“Friends and acquaintances, both locally and as far as Australia, receive letters from Mr Drinkwater.

“And as one lady from Lower Lemington says, she would never dream of throwing her envelopes away.”


Gurbani rendered in calligraphy

Amritsar, Dec 28 (ANI): Hardeep Singh, an artist in Amritsar, has drafted the Gurbani, the Sikh scriptures in calligraphy.

He said he undertook the work because he had not seen anybody doing it before.

“It has been almost a year. The response has been great. Calligraphy means beautiful writing. The art originated in England. I have not seen anybody drafting Gurbani in calligraphy that is why I decided to undertake it,” said Hardeep Singh.

His father, Surindra Singh, himself a collector of art antique’s, helping him with his new venture.

“We have preserved the invaluable pieces of art. Though it is duty of the government to preserve it. We also have some illustrated materials. If government wants I can give it to them,” said Surindra Singh.

Hardeep Singh is a computer teacher by profession, but an artist by heart. He prints the borderline of the page on computer and writes the verses of Gurvani with his hands.

He is the great grandson of Bhai Gian Singh Naqqash, who worked on a portion of the sanctum sanctorum in the Golden Temple. (ANI)

Read more: http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/india-news/now-gurbani-rendered-in-calligraphy_100295650.html#ixzz0booXqvGo


Achyut Palav School of Calligraphy

On weekends Achyut Palav School of Calligraphy conducts sessions dedicated to Devnagri & Roman for those who cannot accommodate batches in the week. On weekends, other Indian scripts like Modi, Urdu & foreign language like Japanese. Special session & workshops like manuscript studies & creativity building will be conducted all year round. The school is also equipped with a calligraphy shop & a library.

read more … http://www.achyutpalav.com/workshop.htm


Glimpses from Callifest 2008

Callifest 2008  was organised at  Sir J. J. School of Art Campus, Dr. D. N. Road, Mumbai , between 15th to 21st Dec. 2008. This fest included an EXHIBITION ,  DEMONSTRATION ,  WORKSHOP  and  LECTURES  on the ART of Calligraphy. Here are a few pictures from the Exhibition … 

callifest_2008_05callifest_2008_03callifest_2008_04callifest_2008_01callifest_2008_02


 
NDK home | Expressing IT | Expressing Palate | Expressing Penmenship | Expressing Awe | Expressing Myself